Naples Airport
October 24, 2019 12:19 am
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Naples international airport

Naples Airport

Naples International Airport (IATA: NAP, ICAO: LIRN)  is the international airport serving Naples and Campania. It is located 3.2 NM (5.9 km; 3.7 mi) north-northeast of the city in the Capodichino district of Naples. The airport has one terminal building: Terminal 1 is used for all the flights.

On 15 February 1958, a United States Air Force Douglas VC-47A Skytrain, 42-93817, c/n 13771, built as a C-47A-25-DK and upgraded, en route from its home base, Ramstein-Landstuhl Air Base, Germany, to Istanbul, departed Capodichino Airport on a flight to Athens airport, with 16 servicemen aboard. Following a report 30 minutes after departure when the crew reported en route at 6500 feet and switching to the Rome ATC, nothing further was heard from the flight, which never contacted Rome,  nor arrived in Greece. Dense fog over the Ionian Sea and mountainous southern Italy on 17 February greatly impeded search efforts for the missing aircraft. “U.S. authorities did not exclude the possibility the plane might have been forced down in Communist Albania.”

On 19 February, the burned and scattered wreckage was found high on the rugged slope of Mount Vesuvius at the 3,800-foot level, about 200 feet below the top of the cone of the volcano. A search plane first spotted the wreckage following “four days of fruitless ground, sea and air search impeded by fog, rain and snow.” Patrols of U.S. servicemen, Italian soldiers and carabinieri reached the crash site four hours after it was found, battling though heavy snow, but reported no survivors amongst the 16 on board. They stated that all had been identified. According to a 1958 Associated Press report, “a surgeon said death apparently was instantaneous.” There were 15 Air Force officers and men from Ramstein-Landstuhl Air Base, and one seaman of the USS Tripoli on board. The report stated that “officials declined to venture a theory on the cause of the crash except that the weather was bad and the pilot, Capt. Martin S. Schwartz of Ashland, Kentucky, had not previously flown from Capodichino field

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